The Mansfield Institute for Social Justice and Transformation (MISJT) presents Juvenile-in-Justice: Photographs by Richard Ross

The Mansfield Institute for Social Justice and Transformation presents Juvenile-in-Justice: Photographs by Richard Ross. 
September 13 -  December15, 2012.

Juvenile-in-Justice is a project to document the placement and treatment of American juveniles housed by law in facilities that treat, confine, punish, assist and, occasionally, harm them.

Winner of the 2012 Best News and Documentary Photography Award from the American Society of Magazine Editors for a selection published in Harper’s Magazine, the photographs in Juvenile-in-Justice open our eyes to the world of the incarceration of American youth. The entire project includes images of more than 1,000 juveniles and administrators from 200 facilities in 31 states, plus extensive information collected from interviews. The hope is that by seeing these images, people will better understand the conditions that exist. Children’s identities are always protected, and faces are never shown.

Richard Ross is a photographer, researcher and professor of art based in Santa Barbara, California. Ross has been the recipient of grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Annie E. Casey Foundation. A dozen books of his work have been published, including Architecture of Authority (Aperture, 2007), Waiting for the End of the World (Princeton Architectural Press, 2005), Gathering Light (University of New Mexico, 2001) and Museology (Aperture, 1988).

The Mansfield Institute for Social Justice and Transformation (MISJT) offers programming that raises awareness and inspires change while creating meaningful transformative opportunities for our students to engage in scholar activism that cultivates them a social change leaders. Our work involves community engagement, critical thinking of social issues and explores solutions for keeping youth out of the prison pipeline and on a path to hope.

Discussion series on Juvenile Detention and Incarceration:

Youth stories on their experiences in confinement
Learn from youth about what life in confinement is like how this experience, and other levels of connection with the juvenile justice system, has impacted their lives.
Wednesday, September 26, 5:30pm.

Chain Reaction: Alternatives to policing
Listen to youth tell stories of their encounters with the police, and then join the dialogues about alternatives to policing as a way to reduce violence and crime.
Thursday, October 4, 5:30pm.

Alternatives to juvenile detention and incarceration: Can we succeed? What will it take?
What Community-based alternatives exist now? How are youth referred to these programs? Are they designed to educate, rehabilitate and address the needs of youth who have drug dependencies, disailities, mental ehalth or trauma issues? Are there enough housing facilities and programs available to youths with criminal records?
Tuesday, October 23, 5:30pm.

Youth with disabilities need education, not incarceration
Youth with disabilities comprise 30 to 8o percent of youth caught up in the juvenile justice system. How can we ensure youth are getting the services they need to succeed in school and beyond?
Thursday, November 8, 5:30pm.

Reentry and life after juvenile confinement: Existing services, or lack thereof, to ensure a successful transition and no recidivism
What services are available to youth when they are released? Is there adequate support for them to complete their education, receive expungement guidance, housing, counseling and other necessary services to ensure that they are successful and don’t recidivate?
Tuesday, December 4, 5:30pm.

RSVP: Nancy Michaels, nmichaels@roosevelt.edu
Cosponsored with Project NIA, project-nia.org.
For details on this series, visit roosevelt.edu/misjt.

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